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Posts Tagged ‘Visualization’

Satellite Collision Debris Tracking in the Google Earth Plug-in

February 23rd, 2009 5 comments

Live Satellite Debris TrackerFollowing on from my visualization of the satellite collision over Siberia on February 10th involving Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251, here’s an Google Earth browser plugin based tracker for the debris from the crash.

Full screen version here: http://barnabu.co.uk/geapi/debris

The application loads up to date Norad orbital elements on start up, and propogates the orbits of all 134 fragments smoothly in real time.

Remarkably the Google Earth API is powerful enough to move placemarks thousands of times a second to give the impression of completely smooth motion for hundreds of objects. On top of that modern browsers are fast enough to run all the Math heavy orbital computation in Javascript. So this is really-real-time tracking, not with delayed updates. Something that can’t be done in regular Google Earth.

I’m guessing the number of objects could increase over time as more wreckage is discovered. If that’s the case, just have to see how well it scales.

Space Crash, Update

February 12th, 2009 1 comment

Space Crash! Google Earth PluginBecause you can never have too many ways to see the same thing. This is a browser based version of my satellite visualization from ealier today. Showing the February 10th coming together of US and Russian communication satellites, Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 over Siberia

Same idea as before, plots the locations of the two objects in the minutes leading up to the collision, but this one runs inside the Google Earth Plugin.

Read more…

When two satellites collide, in Google Earth

February 12th, 2009 No comments

Satellites Colliding in Google Earth

Satellites Colliding in Google Earth

This is a quick Google Earth timeline animation of the recent satellite collision between the Russian Cosmos 2251 and the US iridium 33.

Update 2009-02-14: Two ways to view this now.
– A Google Earth browser plug-in version
– Or the original KML file for regular Google Earth below

Cosmos 2251 and Iridium 33 Collide

Use the time slider at the top of the screen to play the file back. The animation tracks the objects during the 6 minutes leading up to impact. Also included are the orbital paths (ground tracks) of the two objects between 16:00 and 17:00 GMT on February 10th.

Location data is based on the orbital elements for the two satellites, from Celestrak.

Visualizing Twitter Activity Inside the Google Earth Plugin

February 9th, 2009 No comments

Twitter, Google Earth PluginHere’s a browser based version of the (Feb 2009) UK Snowstorm Twitter activity, animated inside the Google Earth Plugin.

This mashes up 3800 Tweets over the course of a week. Users posting their location and the amount of snowfall they were seeing on a scale of 0 to 10. You can see how Twittersphere activity peaks on Monday February 2nd, the day the country ground to a halt. With sporadic outbursts every day over the following week.

Embedded, below the fold.
Read more…

Google Earth 5, World Time Zone Clock – Javascript and KML

February 5th, 2009 19 comments

World Time Zone Clock in Google Earth 5

World Time Zone Clock in Google Earth 5

Here’s a KML and Javascript(!) hack for the new Google Earth 5.

It overlays a time zone map and allows you to click anywhere on the globe to see a running clock with the current time for that location.

Grab the KML file here:

World Clock

This uses normal KML to display a balloon when a polygon is clicked. Each balloon description has its own bit of Javascript to automatically calculate and display the time for the associated time zone.

More Info
In addition to running javascript, this hooks into a couple of other implementation changes in the new GE 5.

  • Polygons are now directly clickable. Previously you had to click on them in combination with a key press to make their description bubbles appear.
  • Stylemap highlight styles are triggered by mouseovers on polygons and lines instead of just placemark icons.

The polygons in this file are drawn from Valery‘s KML Timezone map, posted on the Keyhole BBS a few years ago.